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of the muslim brotherhood and other islamists rallied behind mohamed morsi. nbc's jim maceda is in cairo with the latest on that. >> hi, craig. supporters really needed a massive turnout today at their rally to stem the momentum of the opposition, which has seen hundreds of thousands of real mix of secular, moderate, leftist, liberal, christian and other minority egyptians who have been filling up tahrir square over the past week and which tonight, by the way, continues its ten-city occupation of the square. today in the end belonged to morsi supporters. their show of support was big, at least in the tens of thousands, perhaps 100,000 or more outside cairo university and it really had the feel of a political rally. there were people waving flags, carrying banners and chanting pro-morsi sloegers. there were some clashes reported, not in cairo, but in the north in alexandria between pro and anti-morsi groups. overall, however, the day was peaceful. that's because the muslim brotherhood is much more focused on politics than on protests. it wants to see as quickly as possible the ratificatio
against the new constitution. morsi has set a december 15th date for a vote on the document. joining me is joel rubin, director of policy and government. good to see you again. we're going to begin with egypt. one of your area's of expertise. is there anything in the new constitution that should concern the u.s.? >> well, the united states has major interests with e egypt. the security is a corner stone with our relationship with the arab world. we have to worry about the evolution of their democracy right now. they are in the middle of a difficult transition process after decades of dictatorship. and this constitutional process has had ups and downs. of course, many of our allies are in midst of democratic process sees that are also difficult. so it's not satisfying everybody. it's not satisfying the liberals and the secular groups that we have worked with and know very well. certainly the military will have concerns as well but there's civilian oversight. so it's a mixed bag. >> so the question that has to be asked, does this mean we should overlook potential human rights abuses and v
. i'm chris hayes. a draft of egypt's new constitution will be delivered to president mohamed morsi today. private first class bradley manning accused of leaking classified documents to wikileaks will return to court in fort meade maryland. right now i'm joined by richard a renberg. allen frumin who retired as parliamentarian of the u.s. senate last year. this is his first interview since then. akil amar and sterling professor of law at yale law school. and msnbc contributor, victoria defrancesco soto. great to have you all here. all right. if president obama wants to get anything done in his second term, democrats in the senate will have to overcome one major obstacle, the filibuster. since democrats took control of both chambers of congress in 2007, republicans have used the filibuster as a bludgeon against them to pass basic legislation. the senate bills that actually passed has dropped from just over 25% to a record low of 2.8% this year. the rate held steady at 10% through the clinton and bush years and then plummeted when democrats took control of congress in 2007. that is due
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3